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Document Type

Article

Abstract

As is well known among both my students and colleagues, my professional life as a lawyer (and later as a law professor) took a monumental turn in 1999 when I reviewed and drafted my first wind lease in Nolan County, Texas. That lease, as well as all of the other wind leases at the time, contained contractional “clean up and restoration” clauses similar to many oil and gas leases then in use. Simply put, the leases provided that upon expiration or termination of the lease (which for a wind lease, unlike an oil and gas lease, might be fifty or more years in the future), the lessee would remove its equipment and restore the surface “to as near as reasonably possible to its original condition” prior to the lease.

DOI

10.37419/jpl.V6.I3.21

First Page

245

Last Page

255

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